You know you’ve been a consultant for too long when…

You know you've been a consultant for too long when...

Nick Patterson

Nick Patterson

After some years working in professional services, there might be telling signs that you have been a consultant for too long. Here are 15 signs that it’s maybe time for you to consider a job change!

Are you looking for a freelance opportunity? Click here to browse all our live roles

… someone asks you what you actually do in your job, and you fall deadly silent.

… someone asks for a meeting at 10.00 and you say am or pm?

… you refer to your child’s arts and crafts project as a deliverable.

… you use any of the following words in a social context: consensus, buy-in, robust and ‘let’s step back’, deep-dive, stress-test, stakeholder.

… you refer to getting sign-off for a night out.

… you problem solve for a plan for ‘date night’.

… you say to your partner ‘I’m coming home early tonight’ and the clock’s already hit 8 pm.

… you use colour coded Excel for your shopping list.

… you discuss new Excel functions with your (geeky) friends.

… you explain to the hotel staff what their room policy is.

… you’ve seen more films on a plane than in a cinema.

… you show new employees of the client how to get the best coffee from the machine.

… you perform a SWOT analysis on any major life decisions.

… someone refers to ‘being on the beach’ or ‘on the bench’ and you ask them about their annual billable hours.

… you use PowerPoint to design absolutely everything.

w

More ways our readers know they've been consultants for too long

… you receive a birthday card signed by all front desk staff from the Marriott Renaissance in Rutherford.

… you head out for dinner one weekend with your partner, you recommend “going back to that awesome restaurant…” and they say – that wasn’t me and there isn’t one of those in this city.

… you know the names of all three flight attendants on the Monday AM flight to NYC but not of your neighbour across the street.

… lifetime status at a hotel or airline becomes a positive achievement.

… the rental car or hotel staff says “It’s been a while since we’ve seen you, everything OK?”

… you arrive back to your home airport and customs ask ”where are you coming from sir….” and it’s a complete blank!

… you introduce yourself by starting with, “Good Morning, Good Afternoon and Good Evening”!

… you get to the airport, stop by your favourite diner, and the waitress already has your standard order ready.

… you start referring to the Marriott as home.

… you can unpack/repack in 15 minutes.

… you really geek out on posts like this. 😉

… you wear a Marlins hat to a Bruins hockey games.

…. you speak the wrong language to the postman.

… you have so many passwords, you can’t get into any device.

… you have to think twice before writing country of residence on the Customs re-entry form.

… you pull out the wrong currency at a local MacDonalds.

… your neighbour asks “what did you think of Sunday’s game?” and you have no idea which sport, when or where it occurred.

… you have more friends abroad than in your own country.

… your company thinks you are more loyal to it than to your community of practice.

… you are in an argument with your significant other and say “May I ask a clarifying question?”

… you get a leaving present from the receptionists at the hotel.

… you dread the thought of going to a restaurant (5 times already this week) on a weekend.

… you’re invited to the hotel staff’s Christmas night out because you’ve stayed in that hotel some many times.

… you get a 12:00 meeting request and are relieved that it’s midnight and doesn’t mess up your lunch plans.

… you know flight attendants in person.

… you teach newly on-boarded car rental staff how to process additional equipment and services.

… locals ask you for dining advice.

… you calculate the opportunity costs of the time you spend for pleasure.

… you wake up in the middle of the night and, for a few moments, not know whether you are home or not.

– by Nick & the movemeon community

Hope you enjoyed this article – we regularly publish our content on our LinkedIn page so if you want to keep in touch just click through.

Recent posts

Freelance v. Perm: the reality of costs

There is a lot of uncertainty around how much freelance consultants actually cost compared to perm employees: we’re here to help you understand all of this.

MMO Freelance info pack

We know the challenges faced by employers and freelancers. We overcome these problems for 29k+ members and 1,900+ clients. Find out more in our info pack.

Why it pays to have conversations?

Why it pays to have conversations

Rich Rosser

Rich Rosser

Every conversation is a good conversation. That’s the phrase that I’d like you to remember after reading this post. There are a couple of small caveats (which would bring in an ‘almost’). But I guess there are no rules without exceptions.

What do I mean? I am thinking of someone at least a couple of years into their career. Someone who is ambitious and wants to get the most out of their professional life. And by ‘conversation’ I’m talking about investigating new opportunities – be those with a new employer or a different part of your current employer.

In my experience, there are two types of people when it comes to these conversations. There are those who want to define their perfect next move before even entering into any conversation. And there are those who will explore any opportunity that comes their way so long as it’s not totally and utterly wrong. They might even proactively seek out conversations. I think the latter is more effective than the former.

 

Why?

It's very difficult to define your perfect move

If you come from a consulting background, you will have a lot of different moves open to you as your skill set is very transferable. You will prejudge opportunities based on very little information about the real nitty-gritty of the role and the company. You might even write off the company because it’s not a brand you’ve thought of / know of. But that doesn’t mean that it isn’t a great job opportunity in terms of development, responsibility, team, career progression, pay etc.

You will most likely miss out on cracking jobs because of a natural bias.

w

You'll discover something new in every conversation

There are 2 types of surprise: about the company, or the job and about yourself. This is all about getting over your natural prejudice. Through these conversations, you may discover that you’re better suited to a certain type of job, or a certain size of company than another. Or that a particular company is a lot more interesting than you would have thought. Or that content of the job and the team you’re going to be working with is more important to you than the company (brand, size, industry etc).

 

In summary, each conversation will refine your view of yourself and of your perfect move.

No harm can come of it and you'll grow your network

 

Possibly the worst outcome is that you love the sound of the job but don’t get an offer. Your ego will be bruised but you’ll get over it. And you’ve confirmed the perfect type of opportunity for you. The best outcome is that the job turns out to be perfect and you get it. In the middle (you decide not to progress) is fine too – you’ve discovered something and you’ve expanded your professional network.

 

The only opportunity cost is time off work (you may need to fake a doctor’s appointment) and that is only really a cost for the first conversation – if you decide to progress presumably it’s because you’ve confirmed the opportunity to be interesting.

It may strengthen your position with your current employer

If you are being offered other opportunities, it shows you are in demand. The offers will also come with a pay package so that will clarify your worth in the market. Even if you decide not to take accept these offers, you may be able to use them in negotiations with your current employer. If you’ve found this point interesting, you might enjoy reading about how to negotiate your salary with your current employer.

 

So, when the next opportunity pops onto your radar, please think twice before you dismiss it. What have you got to lose from an application and an initial conversation? Don’t hesitate to have a look at our current job opportunities.

– by Rich

 

Hope you enjoyed this article – we regularly publish our content on our LinkedIn page so if you want to keep in touch just click through.

Recent posts

Freelance v. Perm: the reality of costs

There is a lot of uncertainty around how much freelance consultants actually cost compared to perm employees: we’re here to help you understand all of this.

MMO Freelance info pack

We know the challenges faced by employers and freelancers. We overcome these problems for 29k+ members and 1,900+ clients. Find out more in our info pack.

The digital future of consulting

The digital future of consulting

These days, when people think of consulting firms, they commonly think of multi-million corporations in the middle of central London, occupying the top floors of skyscrapers. And although this may still be the case with a lot of organisations, it seems that whole lifestyle and culture of consulting is changing due to digital advancements

If you’re looking for an opportunity in digital consulting, have a look at our live jobs. 

These changes to the industry have resulted in many groups of people moving to freelance career options. This new style of consulting has only made a noticeable difference in the past 4 years. It is gradually becoming more interactive and engaging, and this trend may gradually change into a complete digitalisation of the sector.

Growth of digital consulting

The growth of digital consulting makes it exciting for newcomers and recent graduates looking to seek an opportunity in consulting. The digital world opens new opportunities for more virtual and freelance consulting opportunities worldwide, as it seems to be easier to communicate and complete tasks digitally. Many CEOs and owners have only positive thoughts for the future of consulting, makings comments such as:

 

In 10 to 15 years, the consulting industry will be thriving even more than today. As technology continues to improve, specific expertise will be not only required but worth more.

 

Jim Morris, President & Owner of The Alternative Board Tennessee Valley.

R

Challenges & opportunities

A challenge that many consulting firms will face is constantly adjusting to match the current economy, as well as adapting to current digital and virtual trends. Consulting firms need to balance their workload in different ways, because while digital technology and virtual communication seem to be the future, there are many clients still used to traditional ways of communication.

 

Although this new way of consulting is important for the industry to grow, currently it isn’t crucial for the consulting sector to fully rely on the advancements of the digital age, as the industry is full of experts in finance, marketing, communications, and so much more. However, traditional consulting has been replaced by digital formats that make processes and communications simpler, and get things done faster. For example, digital transformation allows consultants to examine more data in depth. The depth and detail of analysis made possible by digitalisation aid the consultant in finding issues faster and being able to identify more useful solutions.

w

New clients' needs

The digital world is also changing the needs of clients. Many clients are asking for consultants to help them make the transition to digital. So, as well as digital advances changing the pace of consulting, working with the client to help them develop digitally is additional work for consultants. The amount of effort to inform and educate a client of a new digital cycle and innovative ideas is limitless in the digital world. Because of this, it results in consultants having to cope on multiple fronts; dealing with the traditional forms of consulting and communicating, while having to also accommodate new technological strategies and adjusting to current trends.

 

There are many other aspects to the job for a digital consultant. One of their most recognisable jobs is dealing with a client’s SEO. Next would be social media usage, web design, and advertising. Although each of these is a full-time task in itself, above all the role of the digital consultant is to make a client successful online. As a result, different aspects to their role may be prioritised over others depending on the online position and stature the business.

Consultancies' adjustments

In recent years, many firms such as Deloitte have noticed the change in the digital world, and have adjusted to it well. (Deloitte now has 12% of the consulting market.) Firms such as Bain and Company, 9 Lenses, and KPMG were the first to make the initial steps into digitalisation, and have benefited from this change.  It seems to be only a matter of time until many other firms and opportunities become available through the digital world.

Recent posts

Freelance v. Perm: the reality of costs

There is a lot of uncertainty around how much freelance consultants actually cost compared to perm employees: we’re here to help you understand all of this.

MMO Freelance info pack

We know the challenges faced by employers and freelancers. We overcome these problems for 29k+ members and 1,900+ clients. Find out more in our info pack.